What Did You Think of…The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian?

What did youToday we are going to talk about August’s book of the month, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sheman Alexie.  But first, let’s check out this book and see what it is all about.

Synopsis

Bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot.
Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author’s own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by Ellen Forney that reflect the character’s art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live.
With a forward by Markus Zusak, interviews with Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney, and four-color interior art throughout, this edition is perfect for fans and collectors alike.

Questions to think about and/or answer:

1. Consider the adjectives, “absolutely true” and “part-time.” What concepts appear to be emphasized by the images and the title? Does the cover appear to reference Junior’s internal struggle, or a struggle between Junior and the white power structure, or both, or neither?

2. By drawing cartoons, Junior feels safe. He draws “because I want to talk to the world. And I want the world to pay attention to me.” How do Junior’s cartoons (for example, “Who my parents would have been if somebody had paid attention to their dreams” and “white/Indian”) show his understanding of the ways that racism has deeply impacted his and his family’s lives?

3. When Junior is in Reardan (the white town), he is “half Indian,” and when he is in Wellpinit (his reservation), he is “half white.” “It was like being Indian was my job,” he says, “but it was only a part-time job. And it didn’t pay well at all.” At Reardan High, why does Junior pretend he has more money than he does, even though he knows “lies have short shelf lives”?

(Questions from Guide – Hachette Book Group)

Reviews

“Alexie nimbly blends sharp wit with unapologetic emotion in his first foray into young adult literature.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

“For 15 years now, Sherman Alexie has explored the struggle to survive between the grinding plates of the Indian and white worlds. He’s done it through various characters and genres, but The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian may be his best work yet. Working in the voice of a 14-year-old forces Alexie to strip everything down to action and emotion, so that reading becomes more like listening to your smart, funny best friend recount his day while waiting after school for a ride home.” —Bruce Barcott of The New York Times

Mocha Girls Speak

1220733Mocha Girl Shayla

This is a really bittersweet story about a young Indian boy who changes his life just by deciding to go to school in the all white town and not on the Indian reservation.

Many of the stories are funny and there are cute little cartoons, drawn by the narrator that allow the reader to further understand his feelings. But the novel is also very sad in that it portrays Indian reservations as places where alcohol abuse dominates and hope is practically nonexistent. The status quo is acceptable and those who try to do better for themselves, like the narrator does, can be shunned by the community.

Anyway, on the whole, the book is sweet, sad and funny…like life and would be really good for pre-teens and teens to read.

Mocha Girl Jayla

screen-shot-2016-09-18-at-9-18-30-pmThis book has been added to my list of favorites. There are very few books that have made me laugh out loud and this book is one of them. It was a nice balance of humor and serious elements. One thing I did find interesting was that the thought process of Jr. didn’t come off as that of a 14-year-old boy. He seemed much older. Other than that I think that everyone, no matter your age, race, or ethnicity, can benefit from reading this book.For me, at least, it reinforced the idea that I should always stick to who I am in terms of my likes/dislikes and hopes/dreams. The novel was phenomenal and worthy of the National Book Award.

Mocha Girl Charlene

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Book Details

693208Age Range: 12 – 17 years

Paperback: 229 pages

Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers (April 1, 2009)

ISBN-10: 9780316013697

6387626 52872 52873 13590740 6159 52877

 

Banned Books Week Giveaway Hop

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Hosted by BookHounds

Welcome to another monthly giveaway.

This month is all about Banned Books here at Mocha Girls Read.  Our book of the month is a banned book.  Have you read The Absolute True Story of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie.  Well if not, you should!  It’s a great book.

I bet you are asking yourself …”What’s a banned book?  And what is the big deal?”

Take a minute to watch this 3-minute video from the ALA (American Library Association).

Now on to the giveaway

Enter the rafflecopter below to win 1 copy of any of the books mentioned in the video above.

Must be 18 yrs old and a US resident.

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a Rafflecopter giveaway

Now hop on to the other blogs listed below to win some more bookish prizes.

Twitter Book Club Meeting: The Absolute True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

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Mocha Girl Taaji will be hosting our third Twitter book club meeting and we are all still a little giddy with excitement from the last one.

So what is a Twitter Book Club Meeting you ask?  Well.  It will be a book club meeting with people talking about, discussing and chatting about one book and all the things, topics and ideas that are in the book.  I know fun right?

Now that you are as excited about this idea I bet you are wondering how to join this Twitter Event.  Here are a few suggestions.

1.

Use the hashtag #mochagirlsread with Twitter

Go to Twitter.com

If you have an account sign in and if you don’t then sign up.

Look for the search box and type in #mochagirlsread.  This will pull up all the tweets that have the hashtag in them.  Twitter SearchAnd you will end up here…

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If you click the LIVE tab you will have updates and see all the things going on.  If you would like to chat as well just Tweet using #mochagirlsread at the end of your message.

2.

But I like using a service that is much faster and gives you better reply time called…TWEETCHAT

This is an easy one step process (If you have a Twitter Account).  Go to the site http://tweetchat.com

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Type in #mochagirlsread and hit the Go button then Authorize button.

Done!  You’re in!

So join us on October 3rd at 5pm PST, 8pm EST and let’s chat about The Absolute True Diary of a Part-time Indian by Sherman Alexie.

October’s Book of the Month: Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins

Your votes have been counted!
7 days of nominations!
7 days of voting!
We have a winner for our September’s 2016 book of the month.

The Mocha Girl Read Book of the Month for October is Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins. Take a minute to see what this book is all about.

book coverSynopsis

The debut psychological thriller that will forever change the way you look at other people’s lives.

EVERY DAY THE SAME
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

UNTIL TODAY
And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good?

About the Author

on_the_train2Paula Hawkins worked as a journalist for fifteen years before turning her hand to fiction. She lives in London. The Girl on the Train is her first thriller. It is being published all over the world and has been optioned by Dreamworks.

Read a Q & A with Paula Hawkins

Author’s Website: http://paulahawkinsbooks.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PaulaHawkinsWriter?ref=hl

Buy the Book


Congratulations to Paula Hawkins for being October’s book of the month. Feel free to leave comments below or at Goodreads.com. We are looking forward to hearing what you all think of this month’s selection.

Keep the pages turning ladies.

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Bloggiesta for Bloggers

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Mocha Girls do you blog?  Have a social media account?  Then you and I know there are a few things that need to be done to keep them going.  Like house cleaning for your blog.  Bloggiesta is a blogging event that does just that.  It helps motivate you to get some stuff done, cleaned up and fixed up on your blog.  Here are the words straight from the site.

bloggiestalogoIn short, Bloggiesta is a blogging marathon revolving around ticking off those items on your to-do list and improving your blog while in the good company of other awesome bloggers doing the same thing. Our awesome mascot Pedro (Plan. Edit. Develop. Review. Organize) is ready to break out the nachos, enchiladas, drinks, mariachi music and whack a pinata or two! It’s nothing short of an awesome fiesta!

bloggiestastart-300x123This event started yesterday and goes until Sunday, Sept. 18th

I am doing it because I have a few things to do on Mocha Girls Read’s blog.

  1.  Get the Book of the Month post ready.
  2. Make the October newsletter
  3. Get the October giveaway post ready. (I am planning on hosting a huge giveaway here.)
  4. Update Links We Love page

If you would like to join in with other bloggers to get motivated to get a few things done, join us.  Click here to sign up and start cleaning up.

Olé!