The 2015 VIDA Count

mgr book news

As Women’s History Month comes to a close it seems fitting that as readers we consider the state of women in publishing. Today VIDA: Women in Literary Arts (or VIDA for short) did just that with its release of the 2015 VIDA count.

VIDA is a research organization whose aims to “increase critical attention to contemporary women’s writing as well as further transparency around gender equality issues in contemporary literature culture.” One of the ways VIDA does this is with The Count. Beginning in 2010 and every year since, VIDA counts the rates of publication of male and female authors in various prestigious magazines that published fiction, nonfiction, and poetry during the prior year. The organization looks at whose books were reviewed, who did the reviewing, which authors were interviewed, who the interviewers were and more.

Initially VIDA simply focused on women as a whole in publishing. In 2014 VIDA began taking a more intersectional approach to their research, looking at not only the numbers of women as whole but also specifically at race/ethnicity, sexuality, and ability/disability of women in relation to their representation in publishing. The report showed improvement at some literary journals, but not surprisingly there is room for much more improvement with women of color, non-heterosexual women, and women with disabilities still underrepresented at many publications.

The full report is available at http://www.vidaweb.org/the-2015-vida-count/.

 

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Mocha Girl Tiffani

Blogger at Passport Books
I grew up in northern California. Since then I have lived in Boston, New York, London, and Los Angeles. Wherever I go, I am sure to bring a book for with a book I can travel anywhere in time and space. As an avid reader with eclectic tastes, I'll give just about any genre a try. Whether it is a mystery, fantasy, science fiction, romance, literary fiction, or nonfiction - bring it on. My favorite read is anything with a good story, well drawn characters, a compelling plot, or well crafted sentences – bonus if a book contains all of the above. I joined Mocha Girls I wanted to meet other African-American woman who enjoyed books and reading as much as I do. In Mocha Girl I found an amazing group of women who understand the power of a great story.
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