Why I Love Wednesday

Reflections of a BookaholicMocha Girl Alexis from Reflections of a Bookaholic started a Wednesday Meme called Why I Love Wednesday.  What is a Meme you ask?  According to wikipedia…The term “Internet meme” refers to a catchphrase or concept that spreads rapidly from person to person via the Internet, largely through Internet-based email, blogs, forums, Imageboards, social networking sites and instant messaging.  Basically, a topic from the meme host (Alexis) is posted on participating blogs with blog authors answering it on their site (here).

The topic this Wednesday is… Children’s Book

I love children books and I was just thinking the other week…”Self!  Why did I stop reading them?  New children books come out every day.  Just because I am older I don’t have to stop reading them.”  So I am thinking about getting a few.    Here are a few Children books that I am thinking about picking up.

The story of America and African Americans is a story of hope and inspiration and unwavering courage. But it is also the story of injustice; of a country divided by law, education, and wealth; of a people whose struggles and achievements helped define their country. This is the story of the men, women, and children who toiled in the hot sun picking cotton for their masters; it’s about the America ripped in two by Jim Crow laws; it’s about the brothers and sisters of all colors who rallied against those who would dare bar a child from an education. It’s a story of discrimination and broken promises, determination and triumphs.  Kadir Nelson, one of this generation’s most accomplished, award-winning artists, has created an epic yet intimate introduction to the history of America and African Americans, from colonial days through the civil rights movement. Written in the voice of an “Everywoman,” an unnamed narrator whose forebears came to this country on slave ships and who lived to cast her vote for the first African American president, heart and soul touches on some of the great transformative events and small victories of that history. This inspiring book demonstrates that in gaining their freedom and equal rights, African Americans helped our country achieve its promise of liberty and justice—the true heart and soul of our nation.


One of School Library Journal’s Best Nonfiction Books of 2011
A family silently crawls along the ground. They run barefoot through unlit woods, sleep beneath bushes, take shelter in a kind stranger’s home. Where are they heading? They are heading for Freedom by way of the Underground Railroad.

“We are a family on a journey to a place called wonderful” is the motto of Deza Malone’s family. Deza is the smartest girl in her class in Gary, Indiana, singled out by teachers for a special path in life. But the Great Depression hit Gary hard, and there are no jobs for black men. When her beloved father leaves to find work, Deza, Mother, and her older brother Jimmie go in search of him, and end up in a Hooverville outside Flint, Michigan. Jimmie’s beautiful voice inspires him to leave the camp to be a performer, while Deza and Mother find a new home, and cling to the hope that they will find Father. The twists and turns of their story reveal the devastation of the Depression and prove that Deza truly is the Mighty Miss Malone.

What are some great children’s books that you have run across or read?

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Just another girl who loves to read and then read some more and wants to meet others like me.
  • BookReflections

    You are so right!  I really should pick up children’s books every once in awhile.  We are definitely never too old for them and they are so great.